Psychologists Are Happiest Workers

IT workers’ unhappiness is fed by shifting from a virtual world to reality. Maxim Stulov

Digging though other people's emotional distress happens to be the most pleasurable job for Russians, while fixing computer trouble is the worst, according to a study by recruiting web site SuperJob.ru.

The online poll, conducted at Vedomosti's request in May and June and published Monday, covered 5,000 respondents representing 50 professions. All were asked whether they considered themselves happy.

Psychologists led the vote, with 89 percent saying their lives were great. Only 5 percent said they were unhappy, while the rest were undecided.

Sales managers followed, defying stereotypes about their jobs being tedious, with 83 percent saying they were happy. Third place was split between architects, auditors, marketing managers and construction foremen, each at 82 percent, the study said.

IT administrators ranked as the most distressed group, with 24 percent of them saying they were not happy. Design engineers followed with 22 percent, and security guards with 21 percent.

The most confused groups were unskilled workers, with 19 percent undecided, followed by skilled laborers, personal drivers and security guards, with 16 percent each.

Journalists and editors placed midway, with 76 percent happy, 14 percent unhappy and 10 percent undecided.

Psychologists are the happiest because they are usually self-employed and draw joy from their independence, Vedomosti reported, citing psychologists.

With IT administrators, their unhappiness is boosted by the need to constantly leave a perfect virtual world to interact with the human one, Vedomosti said.

The survey did not specify a margin of error.

The "happy" factors that make up a pleasant job include creativity, social interaction and qualification and education requirements, the report said, adding that unhappy workers usually lack some or all of those factors.

Non-work circumstances also play a role, with many survey participants citing strong family, friends, goals in life and self-development as important things that contribute to their happiness.

Opinions varied, however, on the actual topic of the survey. "Everybody has a different understanding of happiness," one respondent said.

Every third representative of the struggling Russian middle class wants to emigrate, according to a May poll by the Levada Center, cited by Novaya Gazeta on Monday.

The poll covered 1,000 residents of big cities aged 25 to 39 and earning upward of 800 euros ($1,100) a month per family member, with an increase to 1,500 euros for St. Petersburg and 2,000 euros for Moscow.
Twenty-two percent of the respondents said they want to leave Russia forever, the newspaper reported. The bulk of this group is comprised of Muscovites and young people without family.

Germany was the top pick for moving with 19 percent, followed by the United States at 15 percent, Britain at 13 percent, and Italy and France, both at 5 percent.

The study did not mention a margin of error.

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