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Historian Testifies on Chechen Patriarchy in Boston Marathon Bomber Case

Joe Kebartas of South Boston holds a sign reading "Death Penalty is Murder" in front of the Moakley federal courthouse where jury deliberations continue in the trial of bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in Boston, Massachusetts Apr. 8.

A prosecutor has noted that Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev spent little to no time living in Chechnya, a place that a historian had described as having a patriarchal society.

During cross-examination Tuesday, prosecutor William Weinreb said Dzhokhar and his brother, Tamerlan, instead lived in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan and the Dagestan region of Russia before moving to the U.S. in 2002.

Historian Michael Reynolds had said Chechen families are very patriarchal, with the father or son having the clear role as the family's decision maker.

The defense has argued that 26-year-old Tamerlan was the mastermind of the plot, not Dzhokhar, who was then 19. Tamerlan died in a shootout with police.

Weinreb says Dzhokhar smoked cigarettes and marijuana and drank alcohol despite admonitions from Tamerlan.

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