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Grandfather Frost and His Five Russian Residences

Reindeer, sled dogs, bison and Snow Maidens share his homes.

dedmorozmos.ru

Ded Moroz (Grandfather Frost) is the Russian brother of Santa Claus. But unlike his Western gift-bearing brother, Grandfather Frost doesn’t have one residence. He has five. And you and your family can visit them all.

Veliky Ustyug (Vologda region)

This is the official residence of Ded Moroz in Russia, which welcomes visitors all year round. There is a throne hall, a museum, a workshop, a post office, and a souvenir shop in the little house. Children have a full day of performances, games, competitions, and meetings with fairy-tale characters. They can visit the house of crafts and go on rides. During the winter holidays, New Year's events are held every day.

Due to covid restrictions, school or other big groups of children aren't allowed to visit during the New Year's break, but families are welcome.

Children under 14 years old can visit the residence only when accompanied by an adult. Admission for anyone older than 18 is by QR code. And don’t forget to wear a mask!

More information here


				Veliky Ustyug				 				dom-dm.ru
Veliky Ustyug dom-dm.ru

Kuzminki (Moscow region)

Ded Moroz has a quaint pied-a-terre not far from the capital in Kuzminki with special craft houses for children, a special well and a mill. The “Path of Fairy Tales” is dotted with sculptures of Russian and foreign fairy tale characters. There are workshops on the territory where you can, for example, paint gingerbread or Christmas tree ornaments.

The Moscow estate of Ded Moroz runs several different programs for individual family visitors and groups. For example, kids get to meet with the man himself in the “Hello, Ded Moroz!” program. In the interactive program “In Search of Desire” children go through all three towers on the estate, learning how Ded Moroz prepares for the holiday and helping the Snowman find his heart's own desire. They also stop in the post office and office of Ded Moroz, visit the little house of Snegurochka (the Snow Maiden) and a fairy tale library. 

Although entrance to the estate itself is free, there is a fee for the various programs. Visitors older than 18 must show a QR code and everyone needs to wear a mask.

More information here.


				Kuzminki				 				dedmorozmos.ru
Kuzminki dedmorozmos.ru

Toksovo (Leningrad region)

The residence of Ded Moroz in the Leningrad region is in the Zubrovnik park, where local bison roam the hills in the snow. Visitors can choose among three holiday programs. “New Year’s Miracles” is the program for little children age 7 to 10 years old. It’s an interactive quest, and the kids get to take sleigh rides or ride a horse before a tea party. Children age 10 or older can join “Christmas in Zubrovnik.” They meet Ded Moroz and Snegurochka, ride in a sleigh or on horseback and have a tour to the farm and stables. Families of up to four people get their own program. Snegurochka takes the parents and children around the zoo and lets the children feed the animals. Later they visit Ded Moroz, help Snegurochka decorate the New Year’s tree and learn a traditional dance around it.

All the tours and programs are by appointment only and must be prepaid. And, like elsewhere, everyone is required to wear a mask, and adults must have QR codes.

More information here


				Leningrad oblast				 				zubrovnik.ru
Leningrad oblast zubrovnik.ru

Chalna (Republic of Karelia)

Talviukko is the Karelian Ded Moroz, whose sleigh is pulled not just by horses or reindeer but by sled dogs. Guests to his residence in Karelia can meet him and Lumikki (Karelian Snegurochka), take a ride a husky-drawn sled, visit a Sami village and a reindeer farm, and sample Karelian dishes. In Lumikki’s home, children can learn about the folk customs, national rituals, and games of Karelia.

Masks are required for indoor and outdoor areas, and adults must have QR codes.

More information here


				Karelia				 				talvi-ukko.ru
Karelia talvi-ukko.ru

Sharkan (Republic of Udmurtia)

Udmurtia also has its own Ded Moroz — Tol Babai. He wears a lavender colored robe, because from ancient times this color was considered the color of wealth and prosperity among the Udmurts.

Over the New Year's holidays, he and other mythological figures in Udmurtia receive guests, treating them to national dishes and drinks. Families can also enjoy tube sledding, snowmobiles, ATVs, and horses, ancient folk games and rituals. 

To take part in the programs, visitors older than 18 need a QR code, and everyone must wear a mask.

More information here


				Udmurtia				 				tolbabay.net
Udmurtia tolbabay.net

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