Support The Moscow Times!

Moody's Slaps Negative Outlook on Moscow and St. Petersburg

Moody's became the last of the world's three main rating companies to assign a negative outlook to Russia's sovereign bond rating.

International credit ratings agency Moody's has struck Moscow and St. Petersburg with negative outlooks, saying that Russia's own poor ratings prospects have spread to its metropolitan centers.

Moody's simultaneously confirmed the two cities' foreign and local currency issuer ratings and senior unsecured ratings at Baa1.

The cities' negative outlook directly reflects the state of Russia's sovereign bond rating, which Moody's set at Baa1 with a negative outlook on Friday, the agency said in a statement Tuesday.

The cities' ratings nonetheless take into account "a moderate probability of extraordinary support coming from the federal government if the cities were to face acute liquidity stress," the statement said.

While Russia's two largest cities saw their outlooks turn negative, Moody's announced 14 other regions stable, an indication of their ability to "withstand moderate systemic pressure," the statement said.

The regions will be able to manage short-term refinancing risks thanks to assistance from the national government and ongoing lending from state-owned banks, Moody's said.

The ratings for the Krasnodar, Belgorod and Volgograd regions, meanwhile, were affirmed with negative outlooks, based on expected deterioration of their key financial and debt metrics.

With its announcement Friday, Moody's became the last of the world's three main rating companies to assign a negative outlook to Russia's sovereign bond rating.

The agency cited Russia's increased susceptibility to geopolitical risk — caused by the escalation of the Ukraine crisis — and weak mid-term economic growth outlook as bases for the decision.

However, the agency did not decide to lower Russia's rating, saying that the current level of geopolitical tensions over Ukraine will not be enough to further suppress the country's economic growth.

See also:

Standard and Poor's Slaps Negative Outlooks on 18 Russian Banks

… we have a small favor to ask. As you may have heard, The Moscow Times, an independent news source for over 30 years, has been unjustly branded as a "foreign agent" by the Russian government. This blatant attempt to silence our voice is a direct assault on the integrity of journalism and the values we hold dear.

We, the journalists of The Moscow Times, refuse to be silenced. Our commitment to providing accurate and unbiased reporting on Russia remains unshaken. But we need your help to continue our critical mission.

Your support, no matter how small, makes a world of difference. If you can, please support us monthly starting from just $2. It's quick to set up, and you can be confident that you're making a significant impact every month by supporting open, independent journalism. Thank you.

Once
Monthly
Annual
Continue
paiment methods
Not ready to support today?
Remind me later.

Read more