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Zhirinovsky Reflects on Love and Romance in Tweet Screed

Sorry, ladies. He's happily married. Kremlin.ru / MT

Vladimir Zhirinovsky, a Russian lawmaker best known for rabble-rousing rhetoric, has gone soft as the LDPR party leader recounted his thoughts on love.

In the past, Zhirnovsky, 74, has taken heat for calling several prominent Russian women “prostitutes” and telling female journalists they are all suffering from “uterine rabies.” 

But in a series of tweets posted in the days leading up to Valentine’s Day, the nationalist firebrand showed his hopeless romantic side. 

“Love is good, but often it is unrequited. If you do not fall in love mutually, then he or she will suffer,” Zhirinovsky said in a Twitter post, recalling a romantic tragedy he witnessed in his youth.  

“I remember Olya and Yura were in my 8th grade class. She fell in love with him, but he did not pay attention to her. Olya brought herself to the hospital. It's sad. Love is often not meant to be mutual,” Zhirinovsky said.

Zhirinovsky admitted to experiencing unrequited love himself at the tender young age of 19, which made him feel dead inside as he sold his soul to politics. 

“At the age of 19, I was walking along Borovitskaya Square, and suddenly something turned in my chest. I understood that I would never fall in love again. From the next day on, something died in my soul and I was only interested in social issues and politics. I didn't love anyone else. I advise you to protect love, as it may not be repeated,” Zhirinovsky said.

That same day, Zhirinovsky tweeted about celebrating his 25-year anniversary with his wife — but added that he spent their special day meeting with students at the State Duma. 

On Valentine’s Day, Zhirinovsky shared his best love advice for young people: “If you like a girl, do not hesitate to introduce yourself and talk to her. As long as you are shy and wondering how to approach her, she will like the other boy, and you will receive unrequited love. Do not hesitate, everything will be fine.”

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