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Russia’s Top 5 Earners Amass Extra $26.9Bln in 2019 – Forbes

Vladimir Potanin Sergei Karpukhin / TASS

Five Russian gas, oil and metals magnates ended the year as the country’s biggest earners with a collective $26.9 billion haul, Forbes Russia reported Thursday. All five individuals are among Russia’s 6 richest people.

Here is how much Russia’s biggest movers earned in the last 12 months, according to Forbes.

     1. Vladimir Potanin, +$7.8 billion.

Russia’s sixth-richest person with a net worth of $23.8 billion, according to Forbes Russia. He increased his fortune by one-third over the past year, in part thanks to a 30% stake in the world’s biggest refined nickel and palladium producer, Norilsk Nickel.

     2. Leonid Mikhelson, +$5.9 billion. 

Russia’s richest person with a net worth of $27 billion. He is a shareholder in the Novatek private gas producer and Sibur Russia’s largest petrochemicals company.

     3. Vagit Alekperov, +$5.3 billion.

Russia’s third-richest person with a net worth of $23.8 billion. He is the head of Russia’s second-largest oil producer Lukoil, whose stocks have rallied for three years in a row.

     4. Gennady Timchenko, +$4.1 billion.

Russia’s fifth-richest person with a net worth of $22.7 billion. A shareholder in Novatek, Sibur, as well as the engineering construction company in oil and gas Stroytransgaz.

     5. Alexei Mordashov, +$3.8 billion. 

Russia’s fourth-richest person with a net worth of $20.2 billion. He made most of his fortune from the steelmaker Severstal and has expanded his holdings to European tour operator TUI and Russia’s supermarket chain Lenta.

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