×
Enjoying ad-free content?
Since July 1, 2024, we have disabled all ads to improve your reading experience.
This commitment costs us $10,000 a month. Your support can help us fill the gap.
Support us
Our journalism is banned in Russia. We need your help to keep providing you with the truth.

Russian Shipbuilding is 70% Dependent on Foreign Electronics

Russian shipbuilding is particularly dependent on Ukraine for the supply of engine turbines to power ships.

Russia's shipbuilding industry is dependent on foreign suppliers for 70 percent of the electronic equipment installed aboard its ships, despite ongoing government efforts to replace foreign hardware with domestic alternatives, news agency TASS reported Thursday.

“There is a special sphere — an electronics component base and modules where, unfortunately, the dependence on foreign components is about 70 percent,” TASS cited Alexander Navotolsky, the head of import substitution head at United Shipbuilding Corporation (USC), as saying.

President Vladimir Putin has called on major industrial enterprises, such as state-owned USC, to curb their reliance on foreign-sourced components in the wake of last year's ruble devaluation and the onset of Western sanctions against Moscow for its role in the Ukraine conflict.

Navotolsky said that outside the field of electronics, 15 percent of components used in building Russian ships are produced either in member nations of the European Union and NATO or in Ukraine.

Russian shipbuilding is particularly dependent on Ukraine for the supply of engine turbines to power ships. Several Russian military shipbuilding projects have been put on hold for lack of engines after Ukraine's government last year suspended defense-industrial cooperation with Russia.

Navotolsky said the program for import substitution in shipbuilding industry would be finished in 2018. So far, 52 Russian companies have been selected to engage in the import substitution program, he said.

… we have a small favor to ask. As you may have heard, The Moscow Times, an independent news source for over 30 years, has been unjustly branded as a "foreign agent" by the Russian government. This blatant attempt to silence our voice is a direct assault on the integrity of journalism and the values we hold dear.

We, the journalists of The Moscow Times, refuse to be silenced. Our commitment to providing accurate and unbiased reporting on Russia remains unshaken. But we need your help to continue our critical mission.

Your support, no matter how small, makes a world of difference. If you can, please support us monthly starting from just $2. It's quick to set up, and you can be confident that you're making a significant impact every month by supporting open, independent journalism. Thank you.

Once
Monthly
Annual
Continue
paiment methods
Not ready to support today?
Remind me later.

Read more