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French Trio to Perform at Tchaikovsky Music Hall

French violinist Renaud Capucon

The Russian Philharmonic has invited a young French trio to play some of 19th-century composer Johannes Brahms' most popular works at Moscow's Tchaikovsky Concert Hall on Tuesday.

Edgar Moreau, a 20-year-old musician from Paris, will play Sonata No. 1 for Cello with 25-year-old David Kadouch on the piano. Kadouch will also accompany acclaimed 30-year-old violinist Renaud Capucon in Sonata No. 3 for Violin and Piano. Finally, the three French musicians will all play on Brahms' Piano Trio No. 1.

All three works were produced in different periods of Brahms' life, from Piano Trio No. 1, which he composed when he was only 21, to the maturity of the last of his violin sonatas, composed between 1878 and 1888.

Another concert to look forward to is when the Russian Philharmonic is joined by cellists Johannes Moser, Claudio Bohorquez and Boris Andrianov as they play music by J.S. Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, Edouard Lalo and Alfred Schnittke on Nov. 24.

The young French trio is part of a series of concerts produced by the Russian Philharmonic that have brought together a number of bright solo talents.

Earlier this month pianist Nikolai Lugansky, violinist Vadim Repin and cellist Alexander Knyazev played Beethoven's Triple Concerto, the composer's only work for more than one solo instrument.

The Russian National Orchestra also recently played Stephen Goss' rendition of Niccolo Paganini's Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra under the baton of Mikhail Pletnev with Artyom Dervoyed as a soloist.

Tchaikovsky Concert Hall. 4/31 Triumfalnaya Ploshchad. Metro Mayakovskaya. 495-232-0400. meloman.ru

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