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Russian 'Breaking Bad' Fan Changes Name to Jesse Pinkman

Jesse Pinkman, played by actor Aaron Paul

A 20-year-old male Moscow region resident has changed his name to Jesse Geizenbergovich Pinkman, in an apparent homage to characters from U.S. television series "Breaking Bad."

Kirill Andreyevich Nenakhov — from the village of Sofrino, 40 kilometers northeast of Moscow — decided to change his name in May while he was waiting for the start of the second part of Breaking Bad's fifth season, Ridus reported Thursday.

The series' main character is Walter White, a 50-year-old chemistry teacher who has been diagnosed with cancer. White, played by Bryan Cranston, uses his knowledge of chemistry to produce methamphetamine so that he can pay for his treatment. He creates a new criminal alter-ego for himself and adopts the nickname Heisenberg (transliterated into Russian as Geizenberg).

Jesse Pinkman is White's former troubled student, who failed to graduate from school and was kicked out of his home for being a drug addict.

Nenakhov didn't go into depth when explaining his decision, simply saying, "I thought, damn it, why not?"

Ridus posted a photo of the newly created Pinkman wearing a T-shirt bearing an image of the original Pinkman — actor Aaron Paul — along with a rude slogan.

Nenakhov's parents were upset when he first told them about his intentions, but once they calmed down they said, "it's your life, if you want to, then change it."

It took Nenakhov five months to change his passport.

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