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Marley, Libertines At Beat Film Festival

A shot from the Bob Marley doc

Beat Film Festival, which presents a range of documentaries on music and contemporary culture from all around the world, opened late Wednesday at the Gorizont movie house.

One of this year's highlights is Oscar-winning director Kevin McDonald's much acclaimed "Marley," charting the distinctive life of reggae legend Bob Marley. The film opened the festival and is repeated on Saturday.

Homage will also be paid to another musical icon, Ozzy Osbourne, with the screening of  "God Bless Ozzy Osbourne." The film was produced by his son Jack Osborne and looks at Osborne's personal struggles using previously unseen footage.

Other films include "Grandma Lo-fi" about Sigridur Nielsdottir, the Icelandic grand old lady of music who started recording at the age of 70, "The Libertines," which looks at the 2010 reunion tour of the British group and "Beats, Rhymes & Life," a documentary about rap group "A Tribe Called Quest."

Organizers call the festival a unique chance to see documentaries that have not found their way to Russian screens.

In order to be selected for inclusion in the festival, films must have been released within the past two years and must never previously have been screened in Russia. The program ranges from films that have been greeted with wide critical acclaim to those that have only reached only a limited audience.

Beat Film Festival runs through Wednesday. 21/10 Komsomolsky Prospekt. Metro Frunzenskaya. Tel. 795-37-95. http://2012.beatfilmfestival.ru/en.

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