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Krasnodar Has Most Car Crash Deaths in Russia

The government has put together a package of measures to be introduced this year aimed at reducing road deaths, which include tougher measures against drunk drivers.

The city of Krasnodar in southern Russia has topped a list of 10 regional capitals with the highest number of deaths in car crashes, according to a study published Wednesday by the All-Russia People's Front, a political movement.

Krasnodar had 7.1 deaths in car accidents per 100,000 people in the first nine months of this year, according to the research, which used data from the State Road Traffic Safety Inspectorate.

Krasnodar was followed in the ranking by Lipetsk, with 6.9 car-crash fatalities per 100,000 people, and Perm, which saw 6.8 deaths per 100,000 people.

Kemerovo, Irkutsk, Omsk, Voronezh, Krasnoyarsk and Volgograd were also among the Russian cities with most road fatalities.

According to the inspectorate's data, 168,146 people were injured in road accidents in Russia from January to September, 10 percent fewer than in the same period last year. A further 16,638 were killed on the road over the same period, a 15.3 percent decrease year-on-year.

The government has put together a package of measures to be introduced this year aimed at reducing road deaths, which include tougher measures against drunk drivers.

Following his re-election to the presidency in 2012, Vladimir Putin set a target of reducing the national average road mortality rate to 10.6 per 100,000 people by 2018, according to the RBC news agency.

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