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Russian Operating System to Launch in Next Decade

The domestic operating system will be ready for use at all government agencies and “strategic enterprises” by 2025-2030, the report said.

Russia plans to create its own operating system over the next decade, intending to replace Microsoft and Apple software at all government organizations and “strategic” companies, the Izvestia newspaper reported Monday.

The proposal is part of the “Internet development program,” expected to be presented Monday to the Kremlin administration and the Communications and Press Ministry by Russia's Institute for Internet Development, the pro-Kremlin daily reported.

The domestic operating system will be ready for use at all government agencies and “strategic enterprises” by 2025-2030, the report said.

Igor Ashmanov of Russian IT company Ashmanov and Partners said Russia should also aim to build its own hardware by that time, Izvestia reported.

“All jokes are over, we are in a state of economic war, and, as of the end of September, of a 'hot' war as well,” Ashmanov was quoted as saying. “We need technological independence … from processors to applications.”

“The claims that we need to support competitiveness and an open market, and that therefore Western products should receive equal terms on our market, are stupidity and sabotage,” Ashmanov said, Izvestia reported. “All talk about convenient software is a thing of the past.”

Moscow officials have previously called for the creation of Russia's own version of the Internet for domestic use, supposedly to ensure the country's “independence” amid deteriorating relations with the West over crises in Ukraine and Syria.

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