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Germany Jails Russian for Exporting Embargoed Military Tech

EU sanctions imposed over Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014 ban the export of dual-use goods to Russia because they also have military applications. maxpixels.net

A Russian national has been sentenced to seven years in German prison for selling sensitive military technology and chemicals to Russia, the Deutsche Welle broadcaster reported Thursday.

Authorities detained the man, identified as Vladimir D., in December 2018 and his trial began in November 2019. German prosecutors accused the defendant, who reportedly lived in Germany for 25 years, of selling more than $2 million worth of illegal goods to “military recipients in Russia” between 2014 and 2018. 

A court in Hamburg found Vladimir D., 69, guilty of illegally exporting the embargoed dual-use technology to Russia, DW reported.

EU sanctions imposed over Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014 ban the export of dual-use goods to Russia because they also have military applications.

Vladimir D. had exported two pieces of heat-and-pressure technology known as hot isostatic presses. DW reports that the presses are used in the production of plane and rocket engines.

Vladimir D. was also jailed for delivering 4.5 kilograms of a chemical used to make rocket propellants and explosives, according to a report by the German news agency DPA cited in the city of Hamburg’s official publication.

“It was partly transported in airplane luggage, endangering both customs officers and travelers,” the report said.

Vladimir D. forged paperwork and used fake recipients to circumvent export controls, according to DW.

The broadcaster reported that Vladimir D. was also due to deliver 15 kilograms of the chemical, known as decaborane, to a Russian “military recipient.”

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