Support The Moscow Times!

Russia's Security Chief Warns of 'Satanic' and Opposition Influences on Youth

Nikolai Patrushev / Kremlin.ru

The head of Russia’s Security Council has added satanists to a litany of bad influences that young Russians should be protected against.

Young people played a leading role in nationwide anti-government rallies over the past year, leading senior Russian politicians to put forward legislature criminalizing the recruitment of underage Russians in protests.

“Attempts to involve minors in illegal public events and destructive organizations, including religious organizations, totalitarian sects professing the ideas of neopaganism, occultism and satanism should be strictly suppressed,” Russian Security Council chief Nikolai Patrushev was cited as saying by the state-run RIA Novosti news agency Tuesday.

Last month, Patrushev suggested creating volunteer “internet brigades” of popular Russian bloggers to instill patriotism and spiritual values to among Russian youth.

Meanwhile, the ruling political party’s youth wing has said it plans to create battalions “to destroy the myth that the opposition controls the street.”

… we have a small favor to ask. As you may have heard, The Moscow Times, an independent news source for over 30 years, has been unjustly branded as a "foreign agent" by the Russian government. This blatant attempt to silence our voice is a direct assault on the integrity of journalism and the values we hold dear.

We, the journalists of The Moscow Times, refuse to be silenced. Our commitment to providing accurate and unbiased reporting on Russia remains unshaken. But we need your help to continue our critical mission.

Your support, no matter how small, makes a world of difference. If you can, please support us monthly starting from just $2. It's quick to set up, and you can be confident that you're making a significant impact every month by supporting open, independent journalism. Thank you.

Once
Monthly
Annual
Continue
paiment methods
Not ready to support today?
Remind me later.

Read more