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Russian Labor Ministry Tells Civil Servants: Say No to Pricey Gifts

The ministry reminded civil servants that breaching the rules could lead to dismissal or criminal prosecution.

Russia's Labor Ministry has sent the country's civil servants a letter reminding them not to accept gifts ahead of Anti-Corruption Day on Dec. 9 and the upcoming winter festivities, the TASS state news agency reported Tuesday, citing the ministry's press service.

“Exceptions are, for example, gifts received during protocol events, work trips or other official events, if their worth does not exceed 3,000 rubles ($40),” the note cited by TASS said.

The ministry added any gifts exceeding that price limit were considered state property until they were purchased privately by the civil servant in question.

The ministry reminded civil servants that breaching the rules could lead to dismissal or criminal prosecution.

“[It] creates the conditions for a conflict of interests, casting doubt upon the objectivity of decisions taken [by those receiving the gift],” the note said.

It is not the first time civil servants have their memories jolted — a comic book released earlier this year used illustrations to teach the capital's civil servants to keep their hands clean.

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