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One Sabotaged Crimean Power Line Will Be Repaired, But Not Connected

Ravshan, a Crimean Tatar, carries firewood while using a burning oil lamp due to a power cut inside his house in the village of Strogonovka, Simferopol district.

Ukraine's state-run energy company Ukrenergo has reached an agreement with the activists who sabotaged power lines supplying electricity to Crimea. The company will repair one of the power lines without resuming power supply, the Vedomosti newspaper reported Monday, citing Ukrenergo's statement on the company's Facebook page.

“Energy supply will not be restored yet,” the statement read, citing acting director of Ukrenergo Vsevolod Kovalchuk.

Two weeks ago explosions damaged the supporting pylons of several power lines in Crimea, which led to a power blackout on the peninsula. Last week Ukrenergo started repairing one of the lines, but then had to suspend the work by demand of activists who sabotaged the lines.

On Monday Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said that a new energy line from Russia to Crimea must be built faster and called the actions of the Ukrainian government a “diversion.”

“The region is left without electricity as a result of what can be called energy manipulations and the actions of Ukrainian authorities. In legal terms what has been done is a diversion — destroying industrial objects to pursue, basically, terrorist goals,” he was cited by the TASS news agency as saying during a meeting with deputy prime ministers on Monday.

Earlier Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak accused Ukraine of delaying repair work “for political reasons,” the RT news website reported last week. Novak added that Moscow would consider halting coal supplies to Ukraine in response, the report added.

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