Two-Thirds of Russians Approve Military Working for Government

Forty-six percent — twice as many as in 1990 – think that the army's role in the society should stay as it is now.

More than two-thirds of Russians — 67 percent — approve of the military working for the government, a poll by state-run pollster VTsIOM revealed Wednesday. Only 9 percent disagree.

Another 67 percent of respondents were against the military taking power in the country, the poll showed. It is 8 percent more than in 1990. Six percent stated the military should head the country as soon as possible (compared to 7 percent 25 years ago).

Thirty-nine percent of Russians believe that the army sets a good example to society, which is 14 percent more than in 1990. At the same time the number of those who didn't consider it an example slightly decreased — from 47 percent in 1990 to 40 percent this year.

Forty-six percent — twice as many as in 1990 – think that the army's role in the society should stay as it is now, while 40 percent stated that the army's influence should increase, compared to 25 percent in 1990.

The number of Russians who said it should be decreased is significantly lower this year than in 1990 — 5 percent instead of 27 percent, the pollster stated.

The poll was conducted from Aug. 15-16, among 1,600 respondents in 46 Russian regions. The statistical error does not exceed 3.5 percent, according to VTsIOM.

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