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'Black Widow' Suspected of Killing 2nd Husband in Volgograd

A suspected "black widow" in Volgograd has been accused of killing her second husband in the very same way she was convicted of having killed the first.

Both of the woman's deceased husbands worked as police officers, and both were suspected of having been abusive, local website Bloknot-Volgograd reported, citing one a close relative of the 41-year-old suspect.

"Ira just had bad luck with men," the source was cited as saying, adding that "[the second victim] Sasha once tied her to a chair and beat her with skewers. Her entire back was covered in scars. For eight years they lived together like that."

"Sasha" was found earlier this week. Investigators have opened a criminal case over the matter, online news portal Newsru.com reported Wednesday.

The suspect was reportedly convicted of murder for strangling her first husband to death with the belt of a bath robe in 2002.

After serving time for the murder conviction, the woman returned to her hometown and remarried a former police officer, according to local news portal Rodnoi Gorod.

Bloknot-Volgograd reported that the man eventually became increasingly intrusive in his sexual advances, allegedly prompting her to strangle him with a bathrobe belt as well.  

According to Komsomolskaya Pravda, the woman has already confessed to the second killing, telling investigators she "hates cops" during questioning.

See also:

Man Found Guilty, Sentenced for Murder That Sparked Moscow Ethnic Riots

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