Support The Moscow Times!

Lithuania President Asks NATO to Protect Country From 'Crimea-Style' Scenario

Lithuania's President Dalia Grybauskaite waves as she arrives at a European Union leaders summit in Brussels, Belgium.

Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite has urged NATO to deploy troops in the country and said Russian authorities should bury any hope of a "Crimea-style scenario" in Lithuania, a news report said.

Grybauskaite, who attended military exercises Tuesday during which Lithuanian troops practiced repelling enemy attacks, said there is a "vital" need for troops from the Western defense alliance, joined by the three ex-Soviet republics Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania in 2004.

"When we see the increasingly complex situation on the borders of Lithuania and Europe, when Russia is practically destroying the entire sense of security in Europe," she said, NR Baltija reported.

Grybauskaite called Russia's actions in Ukraine "unpredictable, uncontrolled," the Lithuania Tribune said.

"We see a country that is acting aggressively, brutally, ignoring everyone," she said. "In such a situation it is really very important for all countries to have a common position, common understanding, and find ways to peacefully ... find a solution and stop the aggressor."

NATO will triple its usual number of fighter jets patrolling the Baltic airspace next month, increasing the mission to 12 from its current four fighters, an alliance official has said. The jets are on call to respond to any violations of Baltic airspace.

Related:

NATO to Triple Baltic Air Patrol in May


Read more

Independent journalism isn’t dead. You can help keep it alive.

As the only remaining independent, English-language news source reporting from Russia, The Moscow Times plays a critical role in connecting Russia to the world.

Editorial decisions are made entirely by journalists in our newsroom, who adhere to the highest ethical standards. We fearlessly cover issues that are often considered off-limits or taboo in Russia, from domestic violence and LGBT issues to the climate crisis and a secretive nuclear blast that exposed unknowing doctors to radiation.

Please consider making a one-time donation — or better still a recurring donation — to The Moscow Times to help us continue producing vital, high-quality journalism about the world's largest country.