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LUKoil No.1 Private Company on Forbes List

Oil producer LUKoil took the first spot in this year’s Forbes list of Russia’s top 200 largest private companies, a rating based on reported revenue for the previous year.

LUKoil has demonstrated strong performance over the last year, adding 341.9 billion rubles ($10.5 billion) to revenue and bringing the total for 2012 to $112.2 billion.

The second spot was taken by Surgutneftegaz with $26.3 billion and the third by VimpelCom with $22.2 billion in revenue.

There are four oil and gas companies in the top 10, and the rest are in retail, metallurgy and construction.

To qualify for the ranking, at least 50 percent of the company had to belong to Russian private investors. Both unlisted and publicly listed companies were considered.

Taken together, the 200 companies in 2013's list — 56 listed and 144 unlisted — reported revenues of $708 billion.

Last year, Forbes only ranked unlisted companies, putting Tatarstan oil and gas firm TAIF Group in first place with $13.4 billion revenue, Stroigasconsulting construction company in second place at $10.3 billion and wholesaler Megapolis in third place at $9.8 billion of revenue.

Top 10 Private Companies in Russia

Rank

Company

Industry

Revenue $ bln

Employees

   1

LUKoil

Oil and Gas

112.2

112,000

   2

Surgutneftegas

Oil and Gas

26.3

117,000

   3

VimpelCom

Telecom

22.2

58,200

   4

X5 Retail Group

Retail Chain

15.2

109,000

   5

Evraz

Metallurgy

14.2

110,000

   6

Magnit

Retail Chain

13.9

140,200

   7

Tatneft

Oil and Gas

13.9

77,000

   8

Severstal

Metallurgy

13.4

67,300

   9

Bashneft

Oil and Gas

12

57,300

   10

Stroigasconsulting

Construction

12

76,500

Source: Forbes.ru

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