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Downtown Public Parking to Cost 50 Rubles/Hour

Daytime paid parking will return to select downtown streets at a cost of 50 rubles per hour starting Nov. 1, a news report said Thursday.

The pilot project approved by Mayor Sergei Sobyanin envisages the creation of paid parking in the designated area from Nov. 1 until Feb. 28, Interfax reported.

The 20 streets that will be included in the plan are: Uspensky Pereulok, Strastnoi Bulvar from Building 1 to Building 15 and from Building 8a to Building 16/27, Petrovsky Pereulok, Stoleshnikov Pereulok from Building 5 to Building 13/15, Dmitrovsky Pereulok, Ulitsa Kuznetsky Most from Building 2/6 to Building 6, Kopevsky Pereulok, Ulitsa Karetny Ryad, Ulitsa Petrovka, Likhov Pereulok, Bolshoi Karetny Pereulok, Maly Karetny Pereulok, Sredny Karetny Pereulok, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Kolobovsky Pereuloks, Petrovsky Bulvar, Krapivensky Pereulok, Rakhmanovsky Pereulok and Ulitsa Petrovskiye Liny, Interfax said, citing an unidentified City Hall official.

Permit-holding residents of the neighborhood will be exempt from paying the hourly fee of 50 rubles from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. daily.

Parking is currently free on all public roadways and courtyards, while private parking spaces command fees of 50 to 100 rubles per hour.

Sobyanin first outlined plans for the return of paid parking on Moscow streets in early March as part of a wider plan to tackle transportation infrastructure problems in the city.

The mayor cited the nuisance of uncontrolled parking and the inconveniences experienced by public transportation, motorists and pedestrians as a factor in his decision.

A survey published by the Romir research company in July indicated that 38 percent of Moscow drivers are willing to pay for parking.

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