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Spectre of Death Haunts One Quarter of Russians

Almost a quarter of Russians — 23 percent — 'often' think about death, Interfax reported on Tuesday, citing a new study  by Sreda and the Public Opinion Fund.

Researchers found that people over 65 are more likely to think about death than people aged  18-24 (42 percent compared to 14 percent) and that the poor tend to think about it and fear it more than the wealthy.

The study also suggested a correlation between gloomy thoughts and education, religion, location and the number of children one has.

An alarmingly high suicide rate in Russia has cost the country the equivalent in population of a large metropolis since the Soviet collapse, a leading expert on the matter said Monday, which was World Mental Health Day.

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