Support The Moscow Times!

Kiev Man Finds Dog That 'Looks Like Putin' (Photo)

Putin's official Kremlin photo, right, and the dog that some say resembles Putin. kremlin.ru / obozrezatel.com

A man in Ukraine has found a canine whose piercing gaze is strangely reminiscent of President Vladimir Putin's.

The dog, found in central Kiev and first reported by the website Obozrevatel.com, is thought to be a mix between a Staffordshire terrier and a German shepherd.

The canine even appears dressed to be a head of state, with  white markings on its chest seemingly  forming a furry tie.

Further details about the dog — and the man who found it — were not immediately available.? 

Internet commentators were quick to joke about the dog, saying that Putin looks more like the dog than the dog looks like Putin and making references to Mikhail Bulgakov's "Heart of a Dog," in which a dog turns into a man.? 

Popular Irish comic presenter Graham Norton asked wryly on Twitter: "Geeeeeenius! I wonder if it bites the gays?"

Putin has come under harsh international criticism for an anti-gay law passed in June. Supporters of the vaguely worded law say it aims to protect society by making it a crime to "promote" homosexuality among minors. But gay rights defenders say the law has fueled homophobia and led to a surge in attacks, sometimes violent, against gays.

Other Internet users were also amused by the dog photo. A Russian blogger on LiveJournal cautioned, "Just don't make this dog angry," while other people expressed fears — albeit half-jokingly — that the dog's owner might have already been arrested.

One Twitter user wrote simply, "Vladimir Poochin."

Putin, whose press service had no immediate comment about the photo, would perhaps like meeting his doppelganger dog, as the president is an avid dog-lover and owns several of his own.? 

Little is known about this dog, whose photo was first published by the website oborezatel.com.

… we have a small favor to ask. As you may have heard, The Moscow Times, an independent news source for over 30 years, has been unjustly branded as a "foreign agent" by the Russian government. This blatant attempt to silence our voice is a direct assault on the integrity of journalism and the values we hold dear.

We, the journalists of The Moscow Times, refuse to be silenced. Our commitment to providing accurate and unbiased reporting on Russia remains unshaken. But we need your help to continue our critical mission.

Your support, no matter how small, makes a world of difference. If you can, please support us monthly starting from just $2. It's quick to set up, and you can be confident that you're making a significant impact every month by supporting open, independent journalism. Thank you.

Once
Monthly
Annual
Continue
paiment methods
Not ready to support today?
Remind me later.

Read more