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Russian Billionaire Tinkov’s Superyacht Spotted Amid Globe-Circling Voyage

The $112-million vessel, the world's first private icebreaker, was spotted near Kamchatka after wintering in Seychelles and the Maldives. ladatcha.com

Russian billionaire banker Oleg Tinkov’s $112-million superyacht has been spotted off the coast of Russia’s Far East amid its round-the-world voyage, local media reported Tuesday.

La Datcha, the world's first private icebreaker yacht, was spotted entering the port of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky on the Kamchatka peninsula, the Kamchatka-Inform news outlet reported.

The 77-meter, six-deck luxury expedition vessel was delivered last summer and set sail from a Dutch shipyard in November 2020. 

La Datcha, also known as SeaXplorer 77, turned up in Tinkov’s homeland for the spring after wintering in Seychelles and the Maldives in the Indian Ocean. 

According to its schedule as cited by Forbes, La Datcha is expected to remain in the Far East until mid-summer with stops in Kamchatka, the Kuril Islands and Chukotka. It will then embark for Central America and Antarctica, with a September-October stopover in the Mediterranean Sea.

Tinkov has said he intends to use the explorer for 20 weeks per year and charter it out the rest of the time for around $850,000 a week. 

The 12-passenger, 25-staff superyacht is kitted out with snow scooters and a three-person submersible as well as heli-skiing gear with two helicopters. Its amenities include a 150-guest dancefloor, a jacuzzi and a dive center with a decompression chamber.

Tinkov, 53, is awaiting extradition hearings to the United States from Britain scheduled for Sept. 25. He is accused of withholding $1 billion in taxes when renouncing his U.S. citizenship.

He paid 20 million British pounds ($27.5 million) in bail to avoid jail and remain in his West London apartment while contesting extradition.

Tinkov revealed that he was diagnosed with leukemia in March 2020 shortly after his arrest in London.

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