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Student Opens Fire on School in Siberia, Detained by Police

Moskva News Agency

Russian police reportedly prevented a school shooting in Siberia on Friday when they detained a student armed with a rifle who had opened fire on the building after being refused entry.

Armed attacks have rocked schools across Russia over the past year, including a deadly October shooting and bombing at a college in annexed Crimea in which 20 people were killed.

A ninth-grader armed with a rifle was detained after allegedly shooting at school windows and parked cars in the village of Abalakovo on Friday, investigators in the Krasnoyarsk region said.

“Investigators are on the scene interviewing the student, his classmates and teachers,” the regional Investigative Committee branch said in a statement on its website.

No one was reportedly hurt in the incident as the student had failed to get inside the building.

The student was turned away by the school’s security guard, the 360tv.ru news website cited eyewitnesses as saying, after which administrators ordered all entrances to be locked. Police reportedly arrived at the scene within five minutes.

The detained student purportedly sought revenge on a classmate who had allegedly beat him up, according to one of the unnamed students cited by the outlet.

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