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Putin Namesake in Kiev Struggles to Find Job

Anything with the name Vladimir Putin attached to it has of late received loads of attention, though that doesn't mean that everyone who shares a last name with the Russian president takes kindly to being associated with him.

Oleg Putin, a Ukrainian resident with no relation to Russia's head of state, has even had trouble finding a job because of his famous surname, according to a report from Kiev Segodnya that tracked down Ukrainians named Putin, Medvedev and Crimean.

The Ukrainian Putin said that he is always asked about his name when searching for work and that he has been unsuccessful because the "disposition" to his surname is "not very friendly."

Twin brothers Sergei and Alexander Putin said they were against the annexation of Crimea, but rejected the possibility of changing their names.

The several hundred Medvedevs in the Ukrainian capital were more split about their namesake, the Russian prime minister. Dmitry, who lives in the Obolon neighborhood and also shares his first name with the government head, said that he would protect Ukraine from Putin and Medvedev, but a pensioner named Svetlana said that she respected last month's Crimean referendum

Kiev, where people have recently found other tangential connections to Putin, also has a number of people whose names derive from the word "Crimea," spelled "Krym" in Russian. Kiev assembly deputy Sergei Krymchak proposed raising Ukraine's standard of living to make Crimeans want to return, while bus driver Sergei Krymets said with a sigh, "Now we need to go on holiday to Odessa."


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