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Moscow Nanny Says 'Voices' Told Her to Commit Murder

Gyulchekhra Bobokulova

Gyulchekhra Bobokulova, a nanny suspected of murdering a four-year-old girl in her care, said she was prompted to kill the girl by online videos of beheadings and “voices” in her head, the Moskovsky Komsomolets news portal reported Thursday.

Bobokulova, a native of Uzbekistan who is being held in a prison psychiatric hospital in Moscow, said she had been driven by “hatred,” although she felt “a little bit sorry for the girl,” according to the interview with MK. But she was more sorry for herself, MK quoted her as saying.

“The girl was good,” she was quoted as saying. “But I don't have a home. This hatred. I saw how they cut off [heads], and did [the same].”

“I have hatred here,” she said, hitting herself on the chest, according to MK. “I saw on the Internet how they cut off heads … And there was this voice in my head: 'Do the same with the girl.'”

Bobokulova, who reportedly has a history of schizophrenia, signed a consent form, agreeing to psychiatric treatment, doctors were quoted by MK as saying. She said she no longer hears “voices,” but said she wanted to stop treatment and be transferred to an “ordinary jail,” MK reported.

“I walk badly because of the medicines,” she was quoted as saying. “I fall when I get up to go the bathroom. My back hurts, my head hurts.”

Psychiatrists had no intention of releasing Bobokulova to pre-trial detention, deeming her a danger to herself and others, the report said.

Bobokulova was detained after she allegedly appeared on a Moscow street holding the severed head of a young girl who had been in her care, claimed to be a terrorist and shouted “Allahu Akbar.” The incident was captured on video by passersby, and the footage was widely circulated online.

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