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Electricity Hours Reduced From 12 to 4 Per Day as Crimea Forced Into Self-Sufficiency

Ravshan, a Crimean Tatar, carries firewood while using a burning oil lamp due to a power cut inside his house in the village of Strogonovka, Simferopol district.

Electricity supply in the Crimean capital Simferopol has been reduced to four hours per day, said the head of the municipal administration, Gennady Bakharev, the FlashCrimea news agency reported Friday.

Simferopol residents had earlier enjoyed access to electricity for 12 and then nine hours per day, Bakharev added.

On Thursday, the RIA Novosti agency quoted Crimean Prosecutor General Natalya Poklonskaya as saying that the region had “suffered significant harm” after unknown attackers sabotaged the four power lines supplying electricity from mainland Ukraine last weekend.

Meanwhile, the Russian Energy Ministry denied earlier statements by Crimea's First Deputy Premier Mikhail Sheremet, who was reported as saying that 22 megawatts of energy would be supplied to the peninsula from Russia's southern Krasnodar region on Thursday night, the Telegraph.ru news website wrote.

On Thursday, personnel from the Ukrainian state-run energy company Ukrenergo restored one of the four sabotaged power lines; however, electricity supplies have not resumed.

The Ukrainian news website Korrespondent.net reported that the repaired Kakhovskaya-Titan line would only be able to satisfy 40 percent of the peninsula's total energy demand.

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