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For Some, Pussy Riot Trial Is Just a Game

Angry KremlinsA screenshot from "Angry Kremlins," in which users catapult authorities at Pussy Riot figures shielded by glass panes and stone slabs.

The Foreign Ministry is apparently takingseriously criticismfrom abroad of the trial of punk band Pussy Riot, calling Western condemnation biased and driven by an anti-Russian agenda.

But for some, the case is just a game.

Agroup ofEstonian programmers has launched animitation ofthe hit game "Angry Birds" called "Angry Kremlins" that pokes fun atRussian authorities fortheir prosecution ofPussy Riot.

Theaim ofthe game is tostop thefemale punk rockers from"rioting," the game's website says, bycatapulting theheads of Russian Orthodox Church leader Patriarch Kirill andPresident Vladimir Putin atmasked Pussy Riot figures. Kirill and Putin are widely viewed as being behind the rockers' prosecution.

Inan amusing touch, the authorities' heads wince andgroan as their heads smash against obstacles including stone pillars andpanes ofglass.

Theone-level game became aWeb sensation among Twitter users after opposition figure Ilya Yashinposteda link toit on his microblog late Wednesday.

Last week, three Pussy Riot members — Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22, Maria Alyokhina, 24, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, 30 — were sentenced totwo years inprison for"hooliganism motivated by religious hatred" for an unsanctioned performance in Christ the Savior Cathedral. In their "punk prayer," the women called on the Virgin Mary to rid Russia of Putin and condemned Patriarch Kirill for openly supporting Putin's presidential bid.

Meanwhile, the Foreign Ministry has denounced criticism from abroad of the trial, prompting a lawyer for the women to warn the ministry not to risk damaging Russia's reputation further.

In a statement Wednesday, Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich said the court that ruled in the Pussy Riot case thoroughly examined all the facts and acted within the law.

During the trial, the defendants and their lawyers repeatedly cited violations of their rights.

Lukashevich said a person's freedom of expression must not violate other people's rights and freedoms, and he cited international civil and human rights doctrines that he said supported this stance.

He also said international discontent over the trial was skewed and driven by an anti-Russian political agenda. The foreign reaction to the verdict also reflected a "clash of civilizations" — the postmodern West on one side and Christian Europe on the other, he said.

The West believes that religion limits democracy, Lukashevich said. "We, on the other hand, believe that forgetting morality is detrimental," he said.

One of the women's lawyers, Violetta Volkova. replied Thursday to Lukashevich by calling his statement "awkward" and "childishly naive" in a message on her LiveJournalblog.

"I highly recommend that the ministry mind its own business and not comment on the Pussy Riot trial for the world community — do not aggravate the risks for Russian authorities' reputation in the international arena," Volkova said.

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