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Russian Opposition Leader Navalny Pelted With Cake Outside Office

Two cakes were thrown by unidentified men at Russian opposition leader and head of the Anti-Corruption Foundation (FBK) Alexei Navalny near his office on Thursday, the oppositioner wrote on his Twitter account.

"Some clowns just chucked two cakes at me and fled," he wrote in the tweet.

Navalny took a selfie and posted it to Instagram, saying that "this government has such strong support that throwing cakes is the only answer that Putin and Medvedev have to the opposition's claims."

Да-да, такие у этой власти высокие рейтинги и такая мощная поддержка, что единственным возражением на претензии оппозиции Путин с Медведевым видят только метание тортов. -Почему вы украли миллиард? -Вот тебе торт в рожу, хахаха, смотрите, он весь в торте, хахаха. Только что у входа в наш офисный центр какие-то клоуны зафигачили в меня два торта и разбежались в рассыпную. Надо было видеть как я шёл до офиса и поднимался в лифте и какие были лица у тех, кто меня встречал. Зато все в ФБК теперь хотят делать со мной селфи

Фото опубликовано navalny4 (@navalny4)

"Everyone in the FBK office now wants to take a selfie with me," he added.

A similar attack was carried out on Feb. 9 by men of "non-Slavic appearance," who threw a cake at Mikhail Kasyanov, the leader of the PARNAS opposition party, just a week after Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov had published a video of Kasyanov in a sniper rifle scope, the Vedomosti newspaper reported.

Kremlin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov classified the attack on Kasyanov as "bullying" and said it was not related to Kadyrov's video, Vedomosti reported.

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