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Kadyrov Admits Chechen Casualties in Ukraine

vk.com/ramzan

Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov became at least the fifth head of a Russian region to admit casualties in Russia’s invasion of Ukraine that sent shockwaves around the world.

Russia’s Defense Ministry admitted for the first time Sunday that there were "killed and injured" soldiers among its troops in Ukraine without saying how many have died there. 

“Unfortunately, there are already losses among the natives of the Chechen republic. Two died, six more sustained various injuries,” Kadyrov wrote on Telegram on Tuesday.

On Monday, the governors of Russia’s Kalmykia, Kursk and Penza regions said at least one soldier from their respective regions had died in Ukraine. 

The governor of Russia’s North Caucasus republic of Dagestan was the first regional leader to admit casualties from among the local troops.

Kadyrov echoed President Vladimir Putin’s characterization of Ukrainian forces as “nazis” and the claim that Russian forces are not targeting civilian targets after he authorized the so-called “special military operation.” 

Ukrainian authorities on Sunday launched a website to help Russian families track down soldiers who have been killed or captured fighting in Moscow's invasion of the pro-Western country. 

Russia’s human rights ombudswoman said Monday she has agreed with her Ukrainian colleague to work toward helping locate the missing and inspect the treatment of prisoners of war.

The International Criminal Court in The Hague said Monday it was investigating after finding a "reasonable basis" to suspect alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity in Ukraine since Russia seized the Crimea peninsula in 2014.

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