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Walking Vagina Turns Heads in Vilnius

The vagina also made an appearance on the nearby Palanga Beach.

A giant pink vagina walking around the streets of Lithuania's capital turned a lot of heads and caused quite a clamor, so to say, during a weekend event intended to break down taboos about female health problems as part of a "Healthy Vagina World Tour."

The vagina, an almost body-length costume worn by an activist apparently undeterred by the summer sun, was accompanied by women handing out brochures with advice about vaginal health in downtown Vilnius.

But some locals were not too keen about the huge vagina, with its protruding red lips and fist-sized clitoris, parading through the city's streets on Sunday, a national holiday celebrating the coronation of a revered Lithuanian king.

"Maybe I'm too conservative, but this action shocked me," a local mother told the Delfi news outlet. "I understand the goal of the event, but the choice of time and place is wrong. July 6 is a statehood day, and in Vilnius there are a lot of people with children on the streets."

Organizer Jurgita Steponaviciute told the media that a weekend was chosen so that a large number of women would see the event, and that it was just a coincidence it was a holiday. She said that young children probably just thought the giant vagina was some kind of "animal."

The "Healthy Vagina World Tour" has already held similar events in Germany, Israel, Portugal, Scotland and Croatia, according to its website.

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