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. Last Updated: 10/24/2014

Dmitry Rogozin

Dmitry Rogozin

Dmitry Rogozin (Дмитрий Олегович Рогозин) was born on Dec. 21, 1963, in Moscow. His father was a prominent military historian.

Education: Journalism, Moscow State University, 1986. Economics, 1988. Ph.D., philosophy, 1996.

1986-1990: Worked for the Committee on Youth Organizations of the Soviet Union

1990-1993: President of the Association of Young Political Leaders

March 1993: Co-founded the Congress of Russian Communities (KRO), a nationalist movement, led by General Alexander Lebed

1995: Failed Duma run on the KRO list

1997: Elected to the State Duma as a deputy from Voronezh (re-elected 1999, 2003). Served as chairman of the International Affairs Committee.

2002-2004: Presidential envoy in charge of relations between the European Union and Kaliningrad

2003-2006: Chairman of the nationalist, Kremlin-backed Rodina party. The party won about 9 percent of the popular vote in 2003 State Duma elections, collecting 37 of the body's 450 seats. Rogozin stepped down in 2006 when Rodina merged with the Party of Life and the Pensioners' Party to form A Just Russia. Rogozin had had a falling out with the Kremlin after attending anti-Kremlin rallies with opposition figures, and he accused the Kremlin of forcing him out.

November 2006-present: Chairman of the revived Congress of Russian Communities. He has also led the Movement Against Illegal Immigration.

May 2007: Co-founded the Great Russia party, which was denied registration twice

January 2008-April 2012: NATO envoy, replacing General Konstantin Totsky. Prior to his appointment, Rogozin had accused the Western military alliance of carrying out the "aggressive interests of the United States." On being named NATO envoy, he called on Russians to work with the government to return the country to superpower status. As envoy, he heavily criticized U.S.-led plans for a missile shield as well as the idea of former Soviet republics Ukraine and Georgia joining the Western military alliance.

April 2009: Ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary

February 2011: Appointed special representative on anti-missile defense. Charged with leading negotiations with NATO on this issue.

March 21, 2012: appointed special representative of the president on Transdnestr

December 23, 2011-present: Appointed deputy prime minister in charge of the military-industrial complex. Reappointed in May 2012 as deputy prime minister in Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev's Cabinet; areas of responsibility include the armed forces, the defense industry, arms technology development, and the atomic industry.

Russian, Syrian Officials Meet Amid Growing Consensus on Islamic State

At Thursday evening's high-level meeting in Russia's resort town of Sochi, Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin meet Syrian Finance Minister Ismail Ismail.

Rogozin Drives Builders to Finish Cosmodrome Before Winter Comes

With winter on Russia's doorstep, Deputy Prime Ministry Dmitry Rogozin is hounding workers at the Vostochny Cosmodrome construction site in the Far East to complete the spaceport's facilities before the cold sets in.

Russia May Ditch ISS for Moon Program

Russia may favor putting boots on the moon over financing for the International Space Station (ISS) program, Denis Lyskov, deputy director of federal space agency Roscosmos told news agency TASS on Wednesday.

Is Alaska Next on Russia's List?

This Saturday marks 147 years since the U.S. bought Alaska from Russia. If the man in charge of Russia's defense industries gets his way, Sarah Palin will not only be able to see Russia from her front porch, but her front porch will be in Russia.

Bulgaria Rejects Russia's Charge of Disloyalty For Wanting Western Jets

Bulgaria on Wednesday rejected Russian accusations that it was betraying its former Soviet-era ally by considering replacing its aging Russian warplanes with ones built in the West.

Russia's Nuclear Euphoria Ignores Reality

Prompted by the national euphoria over Crimea, Rogozin's promise to modernize Russia's nuclear forces by 2020 is completely unrealistic, writes columnist Alexander Golts.

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